Posts Tagged ‘food poisoning’

Upholding Food Safety Protocols

July 12, 2011

Nobody wants a food safety issue at their restaurant.  Customers don’t want to get sick, and the chef and restaurant staff certainly don’t want to be responsible for food poisoning on their watch.  Therefore, it is important that a restaurant have and maintain strict food safety protocols.

 

Many in the restaurant business know the importance of providing proper food safety training for their staff.  Simple things like knowing when and how to wash hands, storing food properly, and keeping the kitchen clean should be second nature to anyone working in a restaurant.

 

It is also important and should be common knowledge to make sure that food is kept out of the “danger zone.”  Cold food should be kept cold and hot food should be kept hot.  But upholding food safety procedures goes beyond preventing a problem once the food gets into the restaurant.

 

If, for example, spinach is contaminated with E. coli when it arrives at a restaurant, problems could erupt.  So then, it is important for restaurateurs and restaurant staff to ensure that the food being delivered to the restaurant is up to standard.

 

Ensuring the product obtained is free from contamination may involve a little road trip.  Speaking or visiting with the supplier, asking questions, and analyzing the answers are some wise steps a restaurant owner or manager can take.

 

Then, once the food arrives at the door, a trained and knowledgeable person should be there to receive the delivery.  He should inspect and be choosy about what he accepts and what he doesn’t.

 

After he has chosen, it is important that the restaurant staff properly store all food in a timely manner.  Again, this goes back to keeping food out of the danger zone and training the staff in proper food safety protocols.

 

Preventing food borne illnesses at a restaurant ultimately rests in the hands of the restaurant.  They are often the last defense customers have against contamination and food poisoning.  Vigilance is key.